rcmp photo radar

Hudson Bay RCMP Photo Radar Catching Some Fools

(Last Updated On: April 3, 2018)

On April 1st, 2018, some Facebook users where taken by surprise when the Hudson Bay/Porcupine Plain RCMP Detachment posted an announcement on their Facebook page about a pilot program to catch speeding snowmobiles.

We are happy to report that during the 2018/2019 fiscal year Hudson Bay will be part of a pilot program placing photo radar sites in the northern provincial forest to focus on snowmobile speeds. We are currently working on ways to hide the units in stumps and trees. I’m sure the public will agree that this will create a safer environment and provide sorely needed revenue to the province.

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Despite their subtle wording that gave it away (photo radar units aren’t exactly trail cams that can be hidden in trees) and even with them stating how it would “provide sorely needed revenue to the province” (nothing gets public approval less than admitting it’s a cash cow), many reading the post, fell for it hook, line and sinker.

Later in the day their full confession was posted;

April Fools! We hope you enjoyed our post about photo radar in the forest. Logistically a little tough to do plus we keep catching the squirrels exceeding the limit and they NEVER pay their tickets.
The snowmobile act of Saskatchewan dictates speed limits on all provincial trails as 80 km/h unless otherwise posted.
Now you know! Have a safe weekend.

While speed and consumption of alcohol are serious issues that can threaten the safety of everyone on the trails, Hudson Bay RCMP have made it very clear they take the problem seriously, such as their recent attendance at the Prairie River snowmobile rally this past March.

We are always surprised at how far reaching our snowmobile Facebook posts are. We routinely reach over 20,000 people on similar posts.” – Cpl. Adam Von Niessen. Hudson Bay RCMP

Using humour to promote awareness is just one more tool in the Saskatchewan RCMP’s arsenal.

Of course they had already set the bar high with their 2017 “announcement” that they would be encouraging the community to combat speeding by “ticketing people based on the speed of the car travelling ahead or behind you”


But our local RCMP are not the only ones who had some fun on “ALL FOOL’S DAY”

With April Fool’s Day falling on Easter Sunday this year, many were caught up in the moment and some may have fallen for more pranks than they might have if their guard wasn’t lowered. Our local RCMP where not the only ones to try their hand at pranks.

BC RCMP also had a speeding solution using pigeon mounted photos to capture distracted drivers on their cell phones; 

“Traffic officers from around the province are set to receive their winged partners this week, as part of a pilot project. Pigeons will be paired with select traffic officers and will travel in specially designed cages mounted to their police vehicles. Each pigeon is to be fitted with its own camera, to allow them to document offences and for use as evidence in court.”


The Alberta Motor Association took on a different traffic issue… the courtesy wave… 

“The Alberta Motor Association is proud to support the new Mandatory Courtesy Wave legislation, taking effect across Alberta April 1, 2018. Be kind or pay the fine.”


The Canadian Armed Forces got in on the action with a new technology announcement, and though the Fully Operative Obstructive Light-Refraction System (F.O.O.L.S.), was obviously aptly named, a few did admit they “almost fell for it”. It was suggested by one Facebook user, that it could be sold to US President Trump though….


But the true master of deception award goes to the Scottish tourism Facebook page, VisitScotland

Their 2017 April Fool’s was so good, that users had revived it and it was making the rounds again this year. Sharing a clip they sourced from Instagram user, salo_marin, they shared an incredible video of a possible Loch Ness Monster sighting. The clip is so authentic, it has been viewed over 2.8 million times. This truly defines the belief that if something has been viewed and shared by millions, it must certainly be true!

“All Fools’ Day” This is the day upon which we are reminded of what we are on the other three hundred and sixty-four. ~Mark Twain

Post Author: Joanne Francis